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Aaron Stewart
Aaron Stewart

Connect Airport To Mac Via Ethernet Crossover BEST


For Macs that have 10Base-T or 10/100Base-T or faster Ethernet installed and are capable of running MacOS 8.6 or higher, the first Mac can be added to an AirPort network via a crossover Ethernet cable between the computer and the hardware access point and the iBook can be added to the same network by the wireless connection if AirPort or AirPort Extreme is installed.




Connect Airport To Mac Via Ethernet Crossover



If you're not interested in using wireless networking, or your iBook does not have AirPort or AirPort Extreme installed, you can use a simple crossover cable, or Ethernet cables and a hub, to connect your iBook to another Mac. Two "white" iBook models (post-Clamshell iBook systems) -- can be connected to each other or another Mac of similar vintage with a "standard four pair category 5 or better Ethernet cable", as no crossover cable is needed.


A Mac mini G4 can be connected with a standard Ethernet cable to many other recent models. For older systems, assuming that Ethernet is installed, you can just use a simple crossover cable, or Ethernet cables and a hub, to connect another Mac to the Mac mini G4. Although it has not been updated in quite some time, Three Macs & A Printer covers basic types of wired networking in-depth.


For Macs that have 10Base-T or 10/100Base-T or faster Ethernet installed and are capable of running MacOS 8.6 or higher, the first Mac can be added to an AirPort network via a crossover Ethernet cable between the computer and the hardware access point and the Mac mini G4 can be added to the same network by the wireless AirPort Extreme connection.


Do all newer Ethernet ports eliminate the need for crossover cables? Used to be that when connecting two computers (as opposed to a computer and a router or switch), you had to use a special crossover cable. Then ports started getting smart and auto-detecting the type of connection and adjusting accordingly. Is this auto-detection now universal?


For Macs that have 10Base-T or 10/100Base-T or faster Ethernet installed and are capable of running MacOS 8.6 or higher, the first Mac can be added to an AirPort network via a crossover Ethernet cable between the computer and the hardware access point and the iMac G3 can be added to the same network by the wireless AirPort connection if AirPort is installed.


If you're not interested in using wireless networking, or your iMac G3 does not have AirPort installed, you can just use a simple crossover cable, or Ethernet cables and a hub, to connect another Mac to the iMac G3. Although it has not been updated in quite some time, Three Macs & A Printer covers basic types of wired networking in-depth.


For Macs that have 10Base-T or 10/100Base-T or faster Ethernet installed and are capable of running MacOS 8.6 or higher, the first Mac can be added to an AirPort network via a crossover Ethernet cable between the computer and the hardware access point and the iMac G4 can be added to the same network by the wireless connection if AirPort or AirPort Extreme is installed.


If you're not interested in using wireless networking, or your iMac G4 does not have AirPort or AirPort Extreme installed, an iMac G4 also can be connected with a standard Ethernet cable to many other recent models. For older systems, assuming that Ethernet is installed, you can just use a simple crossover cable, or Ethernet cables and a hub, to connect another Mac to the iMac G4. Although it has not been updated in quite some time, Three Macs & A Printer covers basic types of wired networking in-depth.


First off, with older 9 machines you may need a crossover ethernet cable. When connecting with a device that does not need a crossover, then no crossover is needed. This is covered in more detail on Apple article 42717 in their Knowledgebase. You can tell a crossover cable by looking through the clear plastic heads of the cable and looking at the colored wires coming out of the thicker plastic cover of the cable on both ends. If the sequence of colored cables differs when you look at both ends side by side, then it is a crossover. If it is the same sequence of colored cables from left to right with the top of the ends facing you, then it is not a crossover cable. For later Mac OS 9 machines you may want to setup the 9 machine in Target Disk Mode by starting it up with a 'T' key. Machines capable of that are in the target disk mode article on Apple's knowledgebase. If you arrived here, but actually have Mac OS X on both machines, you will probably be better off with Apple's directions for ethernet if Target Disk Mode doesn't work. Otherwise this Mac OS 9 to X ethernet method is preferable when it is available:1. Connect the two machines via the crossover ethernet cable, and startup the 9 machine first.2. Enable Appletalk through the Appletalk control panel on the Mac OS 9 machine.3. Make sure it is setup to run via ethernet.4. Open the TCP/IP control panel.5. Connect Via Ethernet6. Configure via Appletalk7. Give it a static IP of 192.168.168.18. Give it a router address of 192.168.168.19. Give it a subnet mask of 255.255.255.010. Quit the TCP/IP control panel and save settings.11. Open the file sharing control panel and setup file sharing over TCP/IP using the checkbox to enable it. It should then give you an afp://192.168.168.1 address.12. Boot up the X machine. On the Mac OS X machine Enable Appletalk in Apple menu -> System Preferences -> Network -> select Ethernet, and click Configure. Then Appletalk will appear and selecting that will give you a control to enable Appletalk. On internet service providers that use PPPoE that means disabling PPPoE for the connection.13. Select Go in the Finder's Go menu and hit Connect to Server.14. Type in afp://192.168.168.1 and click on Connect. It should now give you the option of connecting to the 9 machine.Double click its drive name in the window and navigate to where you have allowed yourself to connect.If you decide to do this with an ethernet router, your IP will be determined by the router. Same with an airport. So steps 7 through 9 would be condensed if you have a router or airport base station. With a router you also don't need a crossover cable on older machines.Naturally if you use Airport, you change step 5 to Connect via Airport. You do the same with step 12 on the X machine, Ethernet should be substituted with Airport.Note: Networking pre-Mac OS 9 machines to X requires the same instructions, however, the use of a router is necessary to be able to see the IP address assigned to the pre-9 Mac. If using a router does not work, the now defunct Opendoor Shareway IP offers a second solution.Return to Mac OS 9 to Mac OS X migration guide


For the initial backup connect the two computers with a crossover Ethernet cable. Look in the Minis network preferences after the self-assigned IP-address and connect to it using afp. (Finder->Go->Connect to server and enter afp://[IP-address]. Then if the drive is shared you can mount it. It will drastically shorten the time for the first backup.


I know from experience that you can just use a standard ethernet or firewire cable to conect the two and with file sharing turned on the mini should show up in the sidebar of a new window in finder uder the sharing category. just click on the mini in the side bar and click connect at the top right and the select the drive and then open time machine and select the drive there. tis how i used to have it set up at my house before i bought an airport


When my M1 iMac arrives, I will be connecting to my old 2013 27" iMac which I'm keeping until a 32-bit program's conversion to 64-bit is beta. I could use Wi-Fi or an ethernet cable (My old Mac has Thunderbolt-1). And I plan on doing some data transferring with my wife's newer iMac with a Thunderbolt-3 cable, carrying my Mac into her Mac's room.


A medium dependent interface (MDI) describes the interface (both physical and electrical/optical) in a computer network from a physical layer implementation to the physical medium used to carry the transmission. Ethernet over twisted pair also defines a medium dependent interface crossover (MDI-X) interface. Auto MDI-X ports on newer network interfaces detect if the connection would require a crossover, and automatically chooses the MDI or MDI-X configuration to properly match the other end of the link.


With 10BASE-T and 100BASE-TX, separate twisted pairs are used for the two directions of communication. Since twisted pair cables are conventionally wired pin to pin (straight-through) there are two different pinouts used for the medium-dependent interface. These are referred to as MDI and MDI-X (medium-dependent interface crossover). When connecting an MDI port to an MDI-X port, a straight-through cable is used, while to connect two MDI ports or two MDI-X ports, a crossover cable must be used. Conventionally, MDI is used on end devices and routers while MDI-X is used on hubs and switches. Some hubs and switches have an MDI uplink port (often switchable) to connect to other hubs or switches without a crossover cable.


The requirement of connecting the transmitter of one side to the receiver on the other side and vice versa makes it necessary to always have an odd number of crossovers between two devices, with an MDI-X port containing an internal crossover. Thus, connecting MDI to MDI-X requires a straight-through cable (one crossover in total). Connecting MDI to MDI (no crossover) or MDI-X to MDI-X (two crossovers) requires a(nother) crossover in the cable to get an odd number. When using more complicated setups through multiple patch panels in structured cabling, the connection can use multiple patch and building cable segments. It is a good idea to have all necessary crossovers on one side, i.e. either on the central hub/switch or on each secondary hub/switch.


To connect two ports of the same configuration (MDI to MDI or MDI-X to MDI-X) with a 10 or 100 Mbit/s connection (10BASE-T or 100BASE-TX), an Ethernet crossover cable is needed to cross over the transmit and receive signals in the cable, so that they are matched at the connector level. The confusion of needing two different kinds of cables for anything but hierarchical star network topologies prompted a more automatic solution.


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